Shiny Happy Fists of Rage

Hello.

I generally like blogs about anti-racism, feminism (womanism), science, religion, books, vegan recipes, my various fandoms, knitting, and funny shit.

So as you might expect, this blog of mine is some amalgamation of the above.

. . .

You know you love it.

My fandoms:


* Mass Effect
* Dragon Age
* Avatar (TLA and LOK)
* Arrested Development
* Community (sorta)
* Star Trek (DS9 and TNG)
* Song of Ice and Fire
* Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab
* Doctor Who (sorta but not really anymore.)
* Popular Science (Carl Sagan, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michio Kaku, etc.)
People on My Dash

africandiasporaphd:

The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E. Baptist

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation’s original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America’s later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. 

As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence.

Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery’s end—and created a culture that sustains America’s deepest dreams of freedom.

(via navigatethestream)

karnythia:

This baby needs a “Too cute for your ovaries” warning.

genjadeshade:

therearecertainshadesoflimelight:

lindajing:

Emma Watson makes a good point. People are gross. 

Gross? This is below gross. This is vile human behavior. Why did you cross out their screen names? Who gives a shit about their “privacy?” They clearly don’t care about any of the women or their privacy. This should be posted again without the names blocked out. Why are we trying to spare the feelings of total assholes who are sexually harassing women???

And this shit is why I’m having issues being on reddit lately.

(via knitmeapony)

peachberrylove:

kill-dorothy:

I think this video might interest you guys.

4 days ago, Olivia Olson confirmed that Marceline and Bonnibel have dated before. The reason it has been confirmed is because the new Adventure Time book coming out soon may have details on their relationship, and their relationship obviously can’t be aired on TV because some states of America (and countries in the world) are against same-sex marriage and relationships. 

But yeah, they have indeed dated before.

Can we also talk about official Bubbline art drawn by Natasha Allgeri, former character designer and story board artist for Adventure Time, and now Showrunner of Bee and Puppy Cat!?

*internal screaming*

(via merkhaleesi)

miles-wren:

Developing a genderqueer aesthetic. One thing that being in Seattle allows me to explore further is further going away from the binary. But even i have to admit to having wanted to shave for optimal comfort— that couldn’t be the reason for not leaving the house, but ya know.

So i took this little look out to a poetry show and it felt really grand to be so comfy.

Everything but the boots and the bracelet belong to my mother or i should say are in the shared clothing fund. Oh and she constructed the look as well. So i guess you get it from where you come from.

Future note: don’t take photos after you come back from being out (and a glass of wine)— energy levels and lighting will just be ever so much lower.

Other note: the skirt is as old as i am— that’s rather nifty.

This is so fly!

(via jiinsy)

betterthankanyebitch:

She sounds just like Bey…lmao

(via offbeatorbit)

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

a couple of other quotes from the article i really like:

According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace

and

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

(via mercy-misrule)

(via submariet)